New 2018 School Uniform Fashion Trends for Boys and Girls

Cookie’s Kids Looks at Events Such as the 2018 Pratt Fashion Show When Analyzing School Uniform Trends This year’s student-driven fashion event exudes sense of “urgency and responsibility” to do something transformative about global climate change crisis.

New York, United States - May 15, 2018 /PressCable/ —

Cookie’s Kids, the world’s largest kids department store chain featuring everything from premium school uniforms and fashion brands to infant items and toys for all ages, has been once again busy analyzing school uniform trends by way of events like the 2018 Pratt Fashion Show, the Pratt Institute’s annual student fashion event wherein young talent gets to present collections to some of the industry’s most prominent figures. While this year’s show did much of the same, according to Cookie’s representatives, there was one notable difference that may in fact alter the course of modern school uniform trends – a sense of “urgency and responsibility” for the young designers, as well as spectators of the show, to come up with a responsible solution to the global climate change crisis.

In addition to a plethora of premium girls and boys clothing and school uniforms, Cookie’s also offers baby clothing, infant clothes, shoes and accessories. You can find more information here: https://www.cookieskids.com/school_uniforms.aspx

The Pratt Institute’s 119th show, dubbed “Fashion Diversiform,” highlighted work from 20 students due to graduate from the country’s oldest fashion program, and also honored designer Gabriela Hearst. Editor-in-chief of Harper’s Bazaar Glenda Bailey presented Hearst with the 2018 Pratt Fashion Visionary Award, an honor last year bestowed upon none other than the creative duo behind Oscar de la Renta.

With regard to the students’ work in this year’s show, Cookie’s reps noted that each collection’s theme touched upon various social statements including immigration, political polarization and female empowerment. Some of the most memorable moments were demonstrated through the use of unconventional materials – or, at least, say Cookie’s reps, unconventional for fashion; these included duct tape, trash bags and burlap sacks.

“Fashion reflects what’s going on in our society, and when we looked to the runway of this year’s Pratt Fashion Show, we saw such distinct trends – a need for simplicity, conversation, sustainability and wanting things that feel personal and special, unlike anything else,” concludes a Cookie’s spokesperson.

Contact Info:
Name: Al Falack
Organization: Cookie's Kids
Address: 510 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, NY, New York 11201, United States
Phone: +1-718-710-4577

For more information, please visit http://www.cookieskids.com

Source: PressCable

Release ID: 344586

More News From Fortune Week

Clark: Some teams make little effort to justify ticket costs

Feb 19, 2019

NEW YORK — Players' union head Tony Clark took the extraordinary step of saying baseball fans should question whether it makes sense to purchase tickets for some teams, responding to Commissioner Rob Manfred's assertion that free-agent players have failed to adjust their economic demands in a market upended by analytics. Top free agents Bryce Harper, Manny Machado, Craig Kimbrel and Dallas Keuchel remain unsigned with spring training underway, creating tension during negotiations on management's proposals for a pitch clock and new limitations on relief pitchers. The union responded with a wider list of plans that include economic initiatives such as...

New owners plan to move historic riverboat to Ohio winery

Feb 19, 2019

CINCINNATI — The new owners of Cincinnati's historic Showboat Majestic plan to continue using the double-decker riverboat as an entertainment venue on the Ohio River. Adams County real estate agent Joe Brumley and his wife, Cortnee, bought the country's last floating theater for around $110,000 this month, WCPO-TV reported . Cincinnati had put it up for auction, citing high maintenance costs. The boat, built in 1923 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Cincinnati bought it from Indiana University in 1967, and it sat for years at the city's Public Landing before it was sold....

World stocks mostly rise ahead of more China-US trade talks

Feb 19, 2019

SINGAPORE — World stocks mostly rose on Monday ahead of more trade talks between Chinese and American officials in Washington this week. After Asian markets closed with strong gains, European indexes were more subdued. France's CAC 40 gained 0.3 percent to close at 5,168.54 but the DAX in Germany was flat at 11,299.20. Britain's FTSE 100 fell 0.2 percent to 7,219.47. Wall Street was due to remain closed for President's Day. On Friday, China and the U.S. announced plans to resume trade negotiations in Washington, fueling hopes that both countries were edging toward a deal. "We feel we have made...

Shrimpers hope industry lost to warm seas won't be forgotten

Feb 19, 2019

PORTLAND, Maine — Glen Libby looks back fondly on his days as a Maine shrimp trawler, but he's concerned about what seafood lovers will think if the shuttered fishery ever reopens. "Shrimp? What are those?" he said. "There will be a market. But it depends how big of a market you're talking about." Maine's historic shrimp industry has been closed since 2013 due to a loss in population of shrimp off of New England that is tied in large part to warming oceans. And with a reopening likely several years away — if it ever happens at all — Libby...

AP FACT CHECK: Trump spins fiction about diversity visas

Feb 19, 2019

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is going after the "horror show" known as the diversity visa lottery program. His description of it is pure fiction. The president offered a multitude of fabrications and partial truths over the past week on the subject of immigration — both the legal and illegal varieties — as he declared a national emergency aimed at finding the money to build his border wall. He said drugs are flowing across the hinterlands from Mexico, not from border crossings, and suggested that the federal prison population is laden with hardened criminals who are in the U.S. illegally....