Venezuelan 1st lady's 2 nephews get 18 years in prison

In this court room art, an interpreter, stands as he takes notes while defendant Efrain Antonio Campos Flores, center left, makes a statement in Spanish to the judge during his sentencing hearing in New York, Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The interpreter will translate the statement into English and read it back to the judge. Seated at center right is co-defendant Franqui Francisco Flores de Freitas. The men, who are nephews of Venezuela's first lady, were sentenced to 18 years in prison for their conviction on drug conspiracy charges. (Elizabeth Williams via AP)
In this court room art, defendants Efrain Antonio Campos Flores, center left, and Franqui Francisco Flores de Freitas, center right, listen to proceedings during their sentencing hearing at federal court in New York, Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The men, who are nephews of Venezuela's first lady, were sentenced to 18 years in prison for their conviction on drug conspiracy charges. Standing at left is defense attorney John Zach and at right is defense attorney David Rody. (Elizabeth Williams via AP)

NEW YORK — Two nephews of Venezuela's first lady were sentenced Thursday to 18 years in prison for drug conspiracy convictions by a judge who said their ineptness at their criminal craft and otherwise crimeless background earned them leniency.

U.S. District Judge Paul A. Crotty said Efrain Campo and his cousin Francisco Flores "were not the most astute drug dealers who existed. They were in over their heads."

Yet, he added, they schemed in 2015 to capitalize on their political connections to make the flight of a drug-laden private plane from Venezuela to Honduras seem legitimate. Besides the prison time, the judge also imposed $50,000 fines.

Campo, 31, and Flores, 33, are nephews of Venezuelan first lady Cilia Flores. A jury convicted them in November 2016 of conspiring to import more than 1,700 pounds (770 kilograms) of cocaine into the U.S. and other charges that carried a potential life sentence.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Emil Bove requested a 30-year sentence, saying the men were trying to raise millions of dollars in drug proceeds to help fund a political campaign to keep their family in power in a country where its leaders have a reputation for "locking up" those who oppose them.

Defense lawyers requested no more than a 10-year term, saying the men were novices in the drug trade and they never transported drugs.

Each man apologized before the sentence was announced.

"I am very remorseful and ashamed for all the harm and suffering this has caused," Campo said.

"I'm so sorry for the terrible mistake I committed," Flores said. "We're all human, and sometimes we sin."

The judge noted the men seemed "more concerned about the impact on their family than violations of the law of the United States."

Outside the courthouse, Norma Flores, no relation to the defendant, stood with others who were born in Venezuela but moved to the United States. She said the sentence was too lenient.

"The sentence is a slap in the face of all Venezuelans," she said.

She said she went to the courthouse on behalf of all Venezuelans who have lost their lives in protests or are dying because they cannot afford food or medicine.

Lawyers for the men said their clients are misunderstood.

Attorney John Zach said Campo was "shockingly naive."

"He is a gentle soul. He is a good person," Zach said. "He is a danger to no one. He's been thoroughly humiliated by this episode."

Attorney David Rody said Flores was living with a roommate in a two-bedroom apartment when he was arrested in late 2015.

"This is not the life of a drug kingpin," Rody said. "He is not a hardened criminal."

Must Read

Former aide in text: Christie 'flat out lied' in bridge case

Aug 10, 2016

According to a new court filing, a former aide to Chris Christie texted to a colleague that the New Jersey governor "flat out lied" at a news conference about the George Washington Bridge lane-closing scandal

Ex-New England mob boss arrested on charge he killed witness

Aug 10, 2016

Former New England Mafia boss Francis "Cadillac Frank" Salemme (sah-LEHM'-ee) has been ordered held without bail in the 1993 murder of a Boston nightclub manager

Missing weapons among police calls involving murder suspect

Aug 10, 2016

A man charged with killing two Georgia teenagers was identified as the suspect in the theft of a rifle from his grandfather's gun case, officers wrote in reports about multiple police visits to his house in recent years

People also read these

Former aide in text: Christie 'flat out lied' in bridge case

Aug 10, 2016

According to a new court filing, a former aide to Chris Christie texted to a colleague that the New Jersey governor "flat out lied" at a news conference about the George Washington Bridge lane-closing scandal

Changes at Ralph Lauren come at cost investors are OK with

Aug 10, 2016

Ralph Lauren swung to a quarterly loss after the company spent heavily to turn itself around, but the damage was not as bad as many had expected its shares rocketed higher

Asian shares slide after US losses due to lower oil prices

Aug 11, 2016

Asian stocks were mostly down Thursday after a sell-off in energy companies due to lower oil prices pulled down US stocks overnight, and with regional volumes affected by the closure of Japan's stock exchange for a holiday